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This Depression Thing


The whole issue with this depression thing – it has sucked all life out of me like some soul harvester.

This past year has been one of the most relentless struggles I’ve had to endure. It gets worse each day I aimlessly trudge through my daily dosage of hours like a walker. And I don’t see an end in sight.

I feel like I stare at an hourglass in front of me. Glossy-eyed and lost faced, watching each grain of sand tumble through the bottleneck , building up the mountain in the chamber below that represents time passed.

The sand falls in slow motion.

Maybe you can relate?

shades_01I don’t see the sunshine. I’ve had this gray film over my life. It is a sunny, bright, 82º outside my Norfolk, VA apartment. I can’t see it. I don’t feel the warmth in my soul. I keep all the blinds shut. It’s not the kind of depression where you can simply open the blinds and the gray is gone. That doesn’t work. Our friends will suggest it…to open the shades and let the sunshine in. But those who don’t live with it can’t ever understand that just doesn’t work. It’s a fog of war. It stays.It permeates the skin and sinks down to the core. It’s a wave that has to be ridden.

I’ve been riding the crashing part of the barrel for months.

I have no drive. It’s really hard to continue when you feel so hopelessly apathetic. I get so sick of looking at the hourglass and longing for sleep. If I feel inspired to do something I change to something else before I finish what I started. So many things left unfinished. I wander back and forth in my apartment sometimes feeling that I’m going crazy. Most people that don’t live with this affliction would quickly suggest to exercise. All the other articles and advice out there scream that, but how can you bring yourself to that if you can’t even walk across the street to the beach on such an ideal day?

I’m numb and I don’t feel happiness. I don’t feel the happiness that other people feel when it’s sunny out. I should. I want to feel it. I want to feel “normal”. I want the chemicals in my body to react like that. I don’t want to be numb anymore. Catatonic. Zombie-ish. I’m trying to blog it out because journaling is supposed to be the best form of therapy for depression. It hardly is for me. It’s not cathartic. I’ve had an impossible time dragging myself to type this post and hardly feel any form of relief or healing from doing so. Getting a buzz from drinking (exactly the opposite of what I need to be doing, I know) used to give me a tinge of happiness. Now, that doesn’t even work. I’ve lost all interest in all things: writing, drinking, walking on the beach, reading, drawing, sex, photography, being a dad, friendships. I’ve thought a lot about dying. Not being suicidal, but just as a quiet way to end the mind numbing hourglass watching.Quote_gray_001

I fail at relationship. I isolate. I drive people away. I drive myself away from people. I isolate myself from those who love and care about me. It makes me drive those away who love me. 

I’ve lost a foothold in my faith. I used to find peace when I read the Word and prayed early in the morning. That has been sucked away too. I don’t have the same happiness that I see on other believers’ faces, like when I used to go to church. I want that simple happiness of just waking up and being happy. I know they have their own problems, and sometimes that smile is just plastered on, but I just want to feel the Spirit move me to happiness.

*    *     *

How does your depression make you feel?

Maybe all this strikes a cord. If it does, please remember: you certainly are not alone.

 

 

 
10 Comments

Posted by on 08/04/2016 in Depression

 

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Killing Myself | Part 2

Killing Myself | Part 2

*TW

Hello my little failure, we’ve been waiting for your return

We know our pressure’s way too much, we know for what you yearn

A little song of sweet respite, to whet your pathetic appetite

We promise to close the lid real tight, and flood our darkness in to your light

*     *     *

I made a drink of 100 proof, my razor blade of choice

To drown out demon voices, to cut their endless noise

I mixed it full with anger, and hurt, and hopelessness

I drank it quick, I drank it fast, I drank it with relentlessness

*     *     *

Callous words are spoken, when we all need love the most

I needed grace, I needed kindness, and to vent without recourse

Maybe one day we’ll be able, to cast aside our pride

And give the tenderness we need, and put ourselves aside

 

 
 

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Living with a Depressed Male | [Chapter Summary]


Depression jacks up my relationships. Intimate or non-intimate.

I’m not pawning my behaviors off on depression.

Just explaining where they come from.

To improve myself, I must understand myself. unmasking male depression_001

And I’ve found a lot of my answers in “Living with a Depressed Male”, Chapter 14
of Unmasking Male Depression, by Dr. Archibald D. Hart.

Having struggled with depression, not knowing this information led me to feel “crazy”, something a lot of us who survive with mental illness feel. Every. Single. Day.

Though chapter 14 is “primarily for wives” (p. 225), it really helped me understand myself a lot more.

I’d like to unpack it for you.

NOTE: Dr. Hart is a man of Faith but you don’t have to believe for the majority of this information to “make sense”.

*    *     *

I like bullets.

So does my A.D.D.erall.

So instead of summarizing his points in paragraph form I’m presenting them as bullets with page references. My hope is for you to take something away from this and relay it to others.

Here are the points that helped me understand how depression impacts me as a male.


“The Best Things You Can Say to the Depressed Man in Your Life” (p. 231)

  • “I love you and always will because you are important to me.”
  • “I can’t really feel what you are feeling, but I want to understand.”
  • “The best I can offer you right now is to be your friend.”
  • “You don’t have to apologize for the way you feel, because I know you can’t really control it.”
  • “You are not alone in this; I will stay by you until it’s over.”
  • “This won’t last forever, and when it’s over we’ll sing God’s praises together.”
  • “God isn’t causing this. He wants to help you bear it.”
  • “Some of God’s greatest servants have also suffered from depression – and God helped them through it.”

“The Worst Things You Can Say to the Depressed Main in Your Life” (p. 235)

  • “Get your life together; you are a man and can control yourself if you try.”
  • “God isn’t pleased with your life at the moment. Maybe you have unforgiven sin.”
  • “Stop feeling so sorry for yourself and just try a little harder.”
  • “I don’t know how much more of this I can take. You are driving my crazy.”
  • “Remember that there are many people in this world who are worse off than you.”
  • “I’m beginning to think that it was a mistake for me to marry [be in a relationship with] you.”
  • “You should stop seeing those quacks and taking those pills because they’re changing your brain.”
  • “Believe me, I know how you feel because I was depressed once and I didn’t make a meal of it.”

Men are a problem to women but rarely is this intentional. They are to an even greater degree a problem to themselves.

-Steve Biddulph

(p. 225)

How Depression Effects Men & Makes Them Act

  • Depressed men frustrate and alienate those they love the most. (p. 226)
  • Depressed men become monosyllabic, self-absorbed, disinterested in almost everything, and very irritable. (p. 226)
  • Your loved one has not chosen to be depressed. If he could, he would gladly give it up. (p. 227)
  • …depression saps energy and diminishes self-esteem, and it will make your loved one feel worthless and unwanted. Guilt hangs … over every depressed man’s life, and thoughts of dying are very common. (p. 227)
  • …you can …count on there being a major communication problem. Depression shuts down our need to connect and incapacitates our socializing skills. (p. 227)
  • Depressed people become very sensitive to even the slightest rejection and jump to all sorts of negative conclusions and self-blame. (p. 228)
  • Don’t give advice…Men want reassurance that all will be right again. They also want reassurance that you love them and won’t abandon them at this dark moment in their lives. (p. 229)
  • Men express their depressions differently, and this difference revolves around irritability and aggression… (p. 230)
  • Let’s make no mistake about it: men don’t become “nicer” when they are depressed; they often become nastier. If they were mildly irritable before the depression, they become grossly irritable after. They can’t necessarily help it, as it is a by-product of the depression. Depression robs you of all control and turns you into a prickly time bomb. (p. 230)

Caves (e.g., retreating)

  • Caves are bad for depressed men. The problem is the cave’s effect on rumination. The so-called cave experience is deadly to depression because it offers a lot of time for rumination, and rumination feeds the depression just like logs feed the fire. (p. 233)
  • The cave has a soothing effect on men who are depressed, which is why they seek it. But here the soothing feeds feelings of dejection rather than providing a time for escape. Distractions are good. Retreating to solitary confinement isn’t. Depressed men need to be taken out of themselves, not allowed to retreat into themselves where they shut the cave entrance with a big boulder… (p. 234)

So…do you have a depressed male in your life? What has made sense to you here? What do you not agree with? What are your experiences? Thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts.

SOURCE: The words contained in this post are largely the intellectual property of Archibald D. Hart from Chapter 14 of his book, Unmasking Male Depression.

 

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wh atma y me an s2 m3

wh atma y me an s2 m3

 

 

 

 

 

Being mentally ill with depression means that people may not always get me. I’ve come to accept that.

I’ve also come to accept that it’s okay.

A lot of the times I don’t even get myself.

A.

Lot.

I guess “understand” would be a more accurate word.

It’s like trying to explain to somebody what May means to me, except it comes out sounding like this post’s title looks.

They may never understand what it feels like. And I’m happy that they never will. I would wish this on no one.

There’s so many things I’ve never understood about myself for years, and have only begun to within the past 5-10 years of my life.

A list of un-understandables in my life has been:

I don’t understand why I feel sluggish all the time. 

I don’t understand why laughing feels so forced.

I don’t understand why I want to be alone all the time.

I don’t understand why I don’t want to do things.

I don’t understand why I am always so tired.

I don’t understand why I see grey when it’s brightly sunny outside.

I don’t understand why at 42, I can still sleep until 1:30 on a Saturday afternoon.

I don’t understand why I set my alarm for 5:00 am and hit it until 6:00. 

I don’t understand why I think of suicide

I don’t understand why I pray to God to take me home in my sleep.

Over the years I have come to understand why though.

Depression.

A severe, deep-seated depression.

My Specter.

Picture 5

[SOURCE: https://indisposedandundiagnosed.wordpress.com/2015/06/10/this-is-what-chronic-illness-looks-like/comment-page-1/#comment-1817]

NOTE: This image is the original idea of Cass and her site at the above link. Check it out and give it a Like!


 

So for me, the new significance of May is about raising awareness of mental health. And in my case, severe depression and suicide. It’s about taking a chance, stepping out on a scary ledge, and talking about my mental condition to others.

Lessons Learned: Some Things I’ve Learned from My Depression

I would hope that you would take these things and hold them in your heart. Don’t forget them. Remind yourself of them. And learn from your mental condition.

A list of understandables in my life is:

  1. I have a condition, not an illness. I am not sub-human. I am not sick. I am an extraordinarily strong person because I survive through things other people can’t imagine having to deal with. I live my life a little differently than others because I live with affliction.
  2. I am perfectly imperfect, and that’s perfectly okay. I’ve learned to forgive myself and accept myself. I have a hard time believing the phrase, “I don’t let my mental condition define who I am.” I know what people mean, but I think in the end, depression has set some life parameters that I have to (or choose to) live by. If I don’t abide by those…rules, I start to hear Specter’s rusty cage hinges creak and I feel him scratching on the walls of my soul.
  3. What I feel is valid. I am not crazy. I may be a little broken. You may be a little bruised. But don’t you dare let anyone tell you you’re crazy. Don’t you dare let them make you feel that way. You. Are. Not. Crazy. Real talk.
  4. Only I will take care of myself. I must take my meds. Daily. I must eat healthy. I must exercise. Meh. I’m working on the last two. Have
  5. Strive to be empathetic and kind. You know why. You have struggles other people don’t know about. So do others. I remember a time my Lexapro had run out and I couldn’t afford a refill. I had been off it for about four days and I could feel the dizziness set in from withdrawals. Then the bottom fell out. Specter’s claws were dug so deep into my shoulders I could feel them carving at the bones. Someone put their hand on my shoulder and sat with me. I was in tears. I was choking my words out in a dark chair in a dim corner. He made a call to get me my medicine. That’s why.
  6. Be a servant when you can. Help others when they’re down. People have helped me when I’ve not deserved it. Free of charge. Pay it forward.
  7. Exude grace. Strive to give others the benefit of the doubt.
  8. Have grace on yourself. Learn to accept grace yourself. Be gentle on yourself. We beat ourselves up so much each day. Allow yourself forgiveness. See #2.
  9. People do understand – surround yourself with those people. There may not be too many. But you know what? That’s just about the right number anyways. Find your devout warrior supporters and cling to them. Share yourself with them. Open yourself up to them. It is empowering. It is healing.
  10. My God loves me. Me and God. Ahh, yes. For such a lifetime I’ve bashed myself for not measuring up. Engorging bucket fulls of self criticism, guilt, and shame for never feeling like I measured up. Never earning my dad’s approval, or my Father’s. All. Those. Years. And I got it wrong. His scars are enough to cover my soul. His Grace is the way to my healing. His forgiveness is the magnetic north to my moral compass. SOso many times I fail. Flat on my face. He’s always there to pick me up and hug me with a gentle, warm smile.

Now…Let’s take back our lives and make this our new fight song! This one’s for you Niki.

“Cry Thunder”

Time after time as we march side by side
Through the valleys of evil and the torturing souls,
Night after night, for the glory we fight,
In the kingdom of madness and the tales from the old

Death by our hands, for the higher command,
As the darkness surrounds us hear the cries as they fall
Fire burning steel and the tyrants will kneel
Hearts burning stronger with the power of the sword

Set sail for the glory,
Pray for the master of war (pray for the master of war)
Sunlight will fall by the wastelands,
Endless rise for the heroes before

Cry thunder!
Sword in his hand,
Titans of justice, fearless we stand
Cry thunder!
Strong in command
Blessed by the union, freedom of man

Reckoning day, for the demons we slay,
With the force of a dragon we will conquer them all!
Chaos still reigns devastation and flames
For the ultimate glory when the legacy calls

March on
Through the hellfire
Blazing for the darkness beyond (blazing for the darkness beyond)
Nightmare return of the thousands
Giving rise to the heroes once more

Cry thunder!
Sword in his hand,
Titans of justice, fearless we stand
Cry thunder!
Strong in command
Blessed by the union, freedom of man

[Solos]

Unholy darkness,
In the eyes of broken dreams,
Outside of the wasted and torn,
A land of tears still remains
Soldiers of destiny calling,
And the fallen will rise up again,
Conquer the forces of evil and fight to the end

Cry thunder!
Sword in his hand,
Titans of justice, fearless we stand
Cry thunder!
Strong in command,
Saviour of nations, freedom of man

Cry thunder!
Sword in his hand,
Warriors defending,
One final stand
Cry thunder!
Strong in command,
Blessed by the union, freedom of man

Blessed by the union of man
Cry thunder!
Yeah yeah

 

 

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I Want to See What You See | Poetry


Poetry_do you see what i see_001.jpg

Camera lens of happiness, to take away the grey

Cuz sunshine’s there, I see it, it’s just a million miles away.

Camera lens of hopefulness, to take away despair

The never ending fog of war, the loss of will to care.

Camera lens of energy, to take away the apathy

The never ending lethargy, the sits inside of me.

Camera lens of healing, to take away the pain

Cuz sunshine’s there, I know it, even through the rain

 

 
9 Comments

Posted by on 05/02/2016 in Depression, Poetry

 

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Good Friday. Good Thoughts.


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What is (clinical) depression?


It took me many years to realize I had clinical depression. And even more to understand it. At 41 years old I have finally been able to wrap my arms around something that has been a defining part of my life. If you are as confused as I used to be for so many years, I pray this information from the Mayo Clinic provides a small slice of clarity. That’s what surviving the specter is all about – providing hope, clarity, and understanding for those living with clinical depression.

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What does the term “clinical depression” mean?

Depression ranges in seriousness from mild, temporary episodes of sadness to severe, persistent depression. Clinical depression is the more severe form of depression, also known as major depression or major depressive disorder. It isn’t the same as depression caused by a loss, such as the death of a loved one, or a medical condition, such as a thyroid disorder.

To be diagnosed with clinical depression, you must meet the symptom criteria for major depressive disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association. This manual is used by mental health providers to diagnose mental conditions and by insurance companies to reimburse for treatment.

For clinical depression, you must have five or more of the following symptoms over a two-week period, most of the day, nearly every day. At least one of the symptoms must be either a depressed mood or a loss of interest or pleasure. Signs and symptoms may include:

  • Depressed mood, such as feeling sad, empty or tearful (in children and teens, depressed mood can appear as constant irritability)
  • Significantly reduced interest or feeling no pleasure in all or most activities
  • Significant weight loss when not dieting, weight gain, or decrease or increase in appetite (in children, failure to gain weight as expected)
  • Insomnia or increased desire to sleep
  • Either restlessness or slowed behavior that can be observed by others
  • Fatigue or loss of energy
  • Feelings of worthlessness, or excessive or inappropriate guilt
  • Trouble making decisions, or trouble thinking or concentrating
  • Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide, or a suicide attempt

Your symptoms must be severe enough to cause noticeable problems in relationships with others or in day-to-day activities, such as work, school or social activities. Symptoms may be based on your own feelings or on the observations of someone else.

Clinical depression can affect people of any age, including children. However, clinical depression symptoms, even if severe, usually improve with psychological counseling, antidepressant medications or a combination of the two.

SOURCE: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/expert-answers/clinical-depression/faq-20057770

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 04/03/2015 in Depression

 

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I Called My Dad Tonight.

I Called My Dad Tonight.

Earlier today I said I was going to call my dad and tell him he was a good dad and that I love him.

I did.

It was powerful. I read him the post I wrote and cried like a baby all the way through. It was needed…for both of us.

dad_001

2010 – My brother is on the left with sis’ on the right. Dad and I are in the middle.

Before we hung up he said he would like to have a copy of the post.

I attached into to an email after we hung up.

The race

 
10 Comments

Posted by on 03/25/2015 in Dads

 

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The Race [Poem]


I enjoy writing and reading poetry. This is a lengthy poem but well worth the time spent to read it.

I used to not be able to read it without crying because of issues with my dad – feeling like I never measured up; always looking for his approval, etc.

Dad was a senior chief in the US Navy. A respectable, honorable man. A man who provided for our family and was faithful to my mom. He took our family camping and ate dinners with us. He brought us to church and cultivated a respect for women in my brother and I.

I guess this post is, in essence, letting go of the childhood resentment I had for my dad. We never really clicked for whatever reason. It’s still kind of a precarious relationship.

I remember my dad’s “depression” and sadness. He was never diagnosed with depression, but I see the manifestations with what I deal with in my own life. I see them more clearly after the research I’ve done into my own condition. I don’t have memories of him smiling or laughing.

Maybe it wasn’t him. Maybe it was my depression that clouded things? Made me feel shut out. Made my life gray. My dad was a good dad. He wasn’t perfect, but he always tried to do what was right…what was honorable. He was human. He was a man.

I remember writing a suicide note when I was in middle school. I had a razor blade on my desk and was going to end my life. My dad walked in and sat on my bed. “What are you doing?” he asked calmly. I told him what I was doing and he asked why. “Because I always let you and mom down” I replied. I don’t remember anything after that but for some reason I always struggled with my low self esteem for years. Yes, even now as a 41 year old man.

Anyways, once I started teaching high school I read this poem to my students on the first day of every school year. For nine years.

I’m not sure what the point of this introduction is but I hope this poem finds a place in your heart like it did mine.

I think I’ll call my dad today and tell him that he was a good dad, and that I love him.

I love you dad.

family-436831_640 Read the rest of this entry »

 
6 Comments

Posted by on 03/25/2015 in Poetry

 

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Are You Depressed? The Symptoms of Male Melancholy [Reblog]


This is the third installment of The Art of Manliness’ series on male depression. Enjoy the informative  read!

blackdog

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/03/24/leashing-the-black-dog-the-symptoms-of-depression/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheArtOfManliness+%28The+Art+of+Manliness%29

 
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Posted by on 03/25/2015 in Reblog

 

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Leashing the Black Dog: What Causes Depression? [Reblog]


This is a really informative article, posted on The Art of Manliness. It is a lengthy read, but really clarifies some possible causes of depression if you are looking for answer – whether you are a man or a woman. The author’s quote below was my takeaway-

The healthiest approach to dealing with your depression may not be waiting for experts to tell you exactly what’s causing it, but to create a narrative of your own — based on sound reasoning — that leads you to take the most effective action.

What is your takeaway from this post?

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/03/23/what-causes-depression/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheArtOfManliness+%28The+Art+of+Manliness%29

blackdog

 
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Posted by on 03/24/2015 in Reblog

 

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What is Male Depression?


unmasking male depression_001
In his book, Unmasking Male Depression, Dr. Archibald D. Hart presents a frank discussion of depression in males. This is the one book that validated the crazy feelings I couldn’t explain. The grey my life had become. The intense, unexplained sadness that matured since I was in middle school. It crystallized my reality and helped me understand who I was. If you’re a male who is as confused as I was, I encourage you to buy this book.

In this post I take two sections from the book that clearly defined male depression for me. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 03/16/2015 in Male Depression

 

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Link

Here is a presentation on male depression that I found on Slideshare. Well thought out and documented.

 

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This is a GREAT narrative on depression that you NEED to read. [Reblog]


The Art of Manliness has started a short series entitled, “Leashing the Black Dog – A series on Male Depression.” The first post in the series, My Struggle with Depression, was well written and I’m looking forward to the follow-up posts. I think all survivors of depression should give it a read, not just men. You can find it at the link below the image.

blackdog

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/03/09/leashing-the-black-dog-my-struggle-with-depression/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheArtOfManliness+%28The+Art+of+Manliness%29

May you find peace in whatever valley you are travelling.

-Chris

 
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Posted by on 03/11/2015 in Reblog

 

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Laugh for the Night

Laugh for the Night

Laughing helps alleviate sadness. Here’s to pulling ourselves out of the abyss 🙂


d5d2b46cf083e62e4cb1d6036eb441af

 
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Posted by on 03/04/2015 in Humor

 

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Specter, Pt. 4

Specter, Pt. 4

The Final Chapter

This is the final verse of a four part poem on Specter – the personification of my clinical depression and suicide attempt. Please read parts 1, 2, and 3 as well. This project was the result my friend’s inspiration. Thank you @Harry P. X. Frost @ theunrepentantwanderlust.wordpress.com

If you ride the waves, they will subside.

If you have lost hope, there are others in the same valley. Reach out. Share with them.

If you feel you are alone, there are those who will help. Let them carry you.

Good will prevail my fellow warrior.

Peace be with you as you survive through your valley.

-StS

specter_poem_004

 
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Posted by on 02/23/2015 in Poetry

 

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So I had a brief encounter with Specter last night. [JOURNAL ENTRY]

So I had a brief encounter with Specter last night. [JOURNAL ENTRY]

NOTE TO READER: This post mentions suicide. If this is a trigger, please do not read it at this time.

This is what I quickly typed on my computer through a bucket of tears while my daughter was getting ready for her mother to pick her up…


“No Lexapro for 3 days. Weepy and emotional. Swirly headed (from withdrawal?)

“I don’t feel like writing.

“My daughter is in the shower getting ready for her mom to pick her up.

“I’ve been weepy all day…at church…when she got up from the dinner table. Do I talk to her about this? Do I let her know that her dad has a disease? I want her to know that it’s okay. I want her to know that she’s NOT going crazy if she feels like me. I think I  remember reading somewhere that scientists believe that clinical depression is hereditary.

“Her mom may try to take her away from me if she thinks I’m not stable. ‘Mom’s House. Dad’s House.'”

Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 02/23/2015 in Depression, Journal

 

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Specter, Pt. 3

Specter, Pt. 3

This is the 3rd part of my poem on my clinical depression, which I’ve personified as Specter. Please feel free to read the first and second parts.

specter_poem_003

 
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Posted by on 02/22/2015 in Poetry

 

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“The Hidden Causes of Male Depression”

“The Hidden Causes of Male Depression”

In his book, Unmasking Male Depression (pp. 38-52), Dr. Archibald D. Hart discusses the 6 causes of depression in males. This particular section of his book validated the way I was feeling. It crystallized things for me and though I didn’t necessarily like the reality of the situation, had suffered from it long enough that the information was a welcome load lifter. I hope they are helpful if you’re a male who was as confused as I was.

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1.  Testosterone-Induced Depressions. Most prevalent in men with a high sex drive, this type of depression sets in when an established rate of sexual release (orgasm) diminishes (39). When this release isn’t met, males become irritable and aggression rises. Men exhibit behaviors described as “sulking” or “moodiness”. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 02/15/2015 in Depression

 

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A Collaborative Mental Health Blog

iScriblr

Life hacks, fashion and beauty tips, photography, health gyan, poetry and heartfelt musings about everything and anything under the sun!

Grace The Nurse

Health Educator for the New Millenium

Inner-Missions PLLC

"A Journey of Self-Discovery: Remembering Who You Are"

Land of Oyr

The home of Εpic Fantasy world by author Viel Nast, information about upcoming books, history of Land of Oyr, Epic Metal, Epic books and more!

Making Maps: DIY Cartography

Resources and Ideas for Making Maps

Astrographer

Gathering a Community of Worldbuilders

The Wild Heart of Life

Creative Nonfiction & Poetry

Dyson's Dodecahedron

Award Winning Dungeon Design

Fantasy In Motion

Live by the pen, die by the sword...

The Cool Mama

Adventures in gaming

ars phantasia

reflections on fantasy cartography & game design

The World according to Dina

Notes on Seeing, Reading & Writing, Living & Loving in The North

Kristen Lamb

Author, Blogger, Social Media Jedi

flashlight batteries - Ali Grimshaw

writing circles & poetry to keep your light on

Lucky Rabbit's Foot

... not so lucky for the rabbit!

Owning It

Claiming boyhood, staring down sexual abuse. © Brian Dennis 2019

Vital;ty

some scars can’t be seen

English-Language Thoughts

English-Language Thoughts

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields-Addicted to Purple

Growing older is inevitable. Growing up is optional.

Sound Bite Fiction

where nothing is quite what it seems

Discover WordPress

A daily selection of the best content published on WordPress, collected for you by humans who love to read.

From the Darkness into the Sunshine

sexual abuse,survivor,healing,life as whole

The Cotswold Company Blog

The Cotswold Company Blog, inspiring homes with beautiful furniture and interior design ideas.

Lynn Thaler

"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way that its animals are treated." (Ghandi)

Crown Print

a book blog

Speak Out Society

Speak up, even if your voice shakes.

RibbonRx

Raising Awareness About Life

autismthoughts

My experiences with autism, depression, and life

Al Levin's Mental Health Website

From Podcasting to Blogging to Public Speaking and Coaching...

TenacityT.com

PIECES OF ME...

Br Andrew's Muses

From head to pen - A great WordPress.com site

thedrabble.wordpress.com/

Shortness of Breadth

Two Angels and a Black Dog

The journey of a single mum with bipolar

Tanushree Karmakar

MISFIT POETICS

Truth Vindicator

Liberating truth and free thought with words of wisdom, wit and wonder

Joys of Joel

The Poetry of My Life through My Writings and Journeys

Someday Tomorrow

On a journey to a happier place

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